Monthly Archives: November, 2013

The Secret Lives of Errors

Several years ago, I was excited about pouring lots of features into a programming language design, so I asked various people what they would look for if they wanted to use a programming language, even if they had never programmed before. The most common answer was “good error messages.”

I’m rarely frustrated by errors, so I haven’t had much of a basis to think about how they could be handled or messaged better. But recently, thanks to two online discussions (a discussion between David Barbour and me about API usability, and an LtU thread about static-vs-dynamic language lifecycles), I’ve reached some very specific conclusions.

I’m going to make a distinction here between an error mechanism and a design hole. I consider design holes to be the real errors in a program, and the error mechanism is just something that typically happens when a program falls into a design hole.

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