The storytelling worlds of Mega Man and Red Ash

So the Kickstarter for Red Ash is live! I have mixed feelings about it, and to explain, I’m going to have to explain my take on Mighty No. 9 and the Mega Man franchise first.

If you don’t know any of those things, well, they’re all projects that were (for the most part) led by Keiji Inafune, and they’re all about robots. I started being a Mega Man fan at a young age, and it’s funny how seriously I’ve come to take it.

With the 2011 cancellation of Mega Man Legends 3 and some further cancellations that followed, the Mega Man franchise entered a dry spell that’s still ongoing. Keiji Inafune left Capcom, started up Comcept, and eventually unveiled the Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter to great success in 2013. To most people, Mighty No. 9 is a “spiritual successor” of the Mega Man franchise. Likewise, to most people, Red Ash is now a revival of Mega Man Legends 3 in particular.

If I want some simple nostalgic enjoyment like Yooka-Laylee, I’ll buy it off the (virtual) shelf; I don’t need to back it. I back a project when I want it to exist when it otherwise couldn’t, or if I consider it to have positive cultural impact.

Mighty No. 9: Telling stories about responsibility

The Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter was meaningful to me because it was a new launching point for Keiji Inafune to build story worlds.

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