Tag Archives: ethics

Season finale, season premiere

This is a more personal entry than usual. This year, several important things have happened in my life already.

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The storytelling worlds of Mega Man and Red Ash

So the Kickstarter for Red Ash is live! I have mixed feelings about it, and to explain, I’m going to have to explain my take on Mighty No. 9 and the Mega Man franchise first.

If you don’t know any of those things, well, they’re all projects that were (for the most part) led by Keiji Inafune, and they’re all about robots. I started being a Mega Man fan at a young age, and it’s funny how seriously I’ve come to take it.

With the 2011 cancellation of Mega Man Legends 3 and some further cancellations that followed, the Mega Man franchise entered a dry spell that’s still ongoing. Keiji Inafune left Capcom, started up Comcept, and eventually unveiled the Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter to great success in 2013. To most people, Mighty No. 9 is a “spiritual successor” of the Mega Man franchise. Likewise, to most people, Red Ash is now a revival of Mega Man Legends 3 in particular.

If I want some simple nostalgic enjoyment like Yooka-Laylee, I’ll buy it off the (virtual) shelf; I don’t need to back it. I back a project when I want it to exist when it otherwise couldn’t, or if I consider it to have positive cultural impact.

Mighty No. 9: Telling stories about responsibility

The Mighty No. 9 Kickstarter was meaningful to me because it was a new launching point for Keiji Inafune to build story worlds.

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RKN, Constant Time Steps, and Other Adventures

It’s been a couple of years since I posted here! Somehow 2014 turned into an opportunity for me to practice forms of expression other than programming, but that’s not what I’m here to talk about. I still spent lots of time on language design throughout 2014, and I’ve been zooming along in the new year.

Ethics for language design

I still dream big enough in my language design that ethics is an important consideration, but I’ve mellowed down when it comes to long-term ethics, and I’ve riled up a little about short-term ethics. :) Whatever happens, I think we’ll eventually build systems for better communication throughput between people, reducing the kind of violent pressure releases I was afraid of. After all, whatever organizations have better communication methods will probably become more intelligent as organizations, and they’ll outcompete the others. We just have to worry about how brutal that competition will be. So I figure we should foster egalitarianism in ways that cultivate competitive markets. Does that make me a left-libertarian? I don’t even know.

Pragmatics for language design

At this point I think of a programming language as something that has niche value. “Programming” is a rather nebulous term itself, and “language” describes the skill you use rather than the reward you get. As user interfaces go, programming languages are optimized for tasks where the user will have a) a long time to prepare their input, b) a higher tolerance for complexity than for redundancy, and c) a rather strong commitment to their chosen code once it’s deployed out of their reach. Well-designed UIs avoid such high complexity and commitment burdens, so my expectation as a programming language designer is to put myself out of a hobby.

Between complexity and commitment, commitment is the more essential problem. Much of the complexity in programming can be traced back to commitment thresholds: Either the bit is set, or it’s clear, never in between. Furthermore I think it’s plausible to trace this back to the mind-body threshold: Human minds are so disconnected from each other that we insist on personal identity, and this insistence lends a sense of absolute discreteness to so many of the concepts we form. (Although I’m attributing this to humans, this might be more specifically a Western trend. My perspective is too myopic to tell.)

On the other hand, not all complex artifacts are deployed with a high commitment cost. Sometimes people deploy complex artifacts because they can’t help it, leaving behind fingerprints and memories. We might want to take advantage of this, focusing on programming languages that help us interpret found artifacts in a useful way.

If I’m on the right track here, then programs would do best to be shaped like some kind of fingerprint, and encapsulation boundaries in programming would do best to behave like the encapsulation boundaries of people. That way we’re not introducing unnecessary concepts. Well, people are vaguely like modules: Not only is a program module encapsulated in a way vaguely similar to a person, but orderless sets of interacting modules are vaguely similar to orderless sets of interacting people. When modules interact, their interaction membrane, if we took a fingerprint of it, would be their import/export type signature. Maybe a type signature is a fingerprint for person-to-person interaction too.

Based on this train of thought, we might like to find a language with only type signatures. If we took a typed functional language with implicits or type classes, removed everything but the type signatures, and tried to program with it anyway, we would accomplish some form of logic programming. Maybe logic programming languages are on to something.

Below the cut, I’ll list some of the language projects I’ve worked on over the past year or two. The above philosophical premises will be relevant for a few of them, but I won’t refrain from discussing tangential features and challenges I’m excited about. If you’d like to avoid most of the technical meat-fluff and get back to the philosophical fluff-meat, I recommend skipping to the section titled “Era Tenerezza” and reading from there. :)

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The Secret Lives of Errors

Several years ago, I was excited about pouring lots of features into a programming language design, so I asked various people what they would look for if they wanted to use a programming language, even if they had never programmed before. The most common answer was “good error messages.”

I’m rarely frustrated by errors, so I haven’t had much of a basis to think about how they could be handled or messaged better. But recently, thanks to two online discussions (a discussion between David Barbour and me about API usability, and an LtU thread about static-vs-dynamic language lifecycles), I’ve reached some very specific conclusions.

I’m going to make a distinction here between an error mechanism and a design hole. I consider design holes to be the real errors in a program, and the error mechanism is just something that typically happens when a program falls into a design hole.

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